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Hedgehog Foraging In The Grass Jigsaw Puzzle Game

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Hedgehog Foraging In The Grass Puzzle Details:

About: In this new puzzle we feature a cute hedgehog foraging in the grass. Hedgehogs are omnivorous, they feed on insects, snails, frogs and toads, snakes, bird eggs, carrion, mushrooms, grass roots, berries, melons and watermelons. There are seventeen species of hedgehog in five genera found through parts of Europe, Asia, and Africa, and in New Zealand by introduction. The name hedgehog came into use around the year 1450, derived from the Middle English heyghoge, from heyg, hegge ("hedge"), because it frequents hedgerows, and hoge, hogge ("hog"), from its piglike snout.
Puzzle Of The Day On: 02/Aug/2020

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